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U.S. National Strategy for Public Diplomacy and Strategic Communication

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Citation Edit

U.S. Department of State, Policy Coordinating Committee for Public Diplomacy and Strategic Communication, U.S. National Strategy for Public Diplomacy and Strategic Communication (2007) (full-text).

Overview Edit

This Strategy provided a plan for diplomats and other government officials and is the first national strategy for public diplomacy. It articulates three strategic objectives for U.S. government communications with foreign publics:

  1. America must offer a positive vision of hope and opportunity that is rooted in our most basic values.
  2. With our partners, we seek to isolate and marginalize violent extremists who threaten the freedom and peace sought by civilized people of every nation, culture and faith.
  3. America must work to nurture common interests and values between Americans and peoples of different countries, cultures and faiths across the world.

It identifies three main target audiences: (1) key influencers, those who can effectively guide foreign societies in line with U.S. interests; (2) vulnerable populations, including the youth, women and girls, and minority groups; and (3) mass audiences, who are more connected to information about the United States and the world than ever before through new and expanding global communications media.

The Strategy identifies three public diplomacy priorities:

  • expand education and exchange programs, "perhaps the single most effective public diplomacy tool of the last fifty years";
  • modernize communications, including a heightened profile for U.S. officials in foreign media, increased foreign language training for U.S. diplomats, and utilization of Internet media such as web chats, blogs, and interactive websites; and
  • promote the "diplomacy of deeds," publicizing U.S. activities to benefit foreign populations through humanitarian assistance, health and education programs, and economic development, as well as U.S. government activities that show respect for foreign culture and history.

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