Fandom

The IT Law Wiki

Technology Transfer: Barriers Limit Royalty Sharing's Effectiveness

32,198pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Citation Edit

General Accounting Office, Technology Transfer: Barriers Limit Royalty Sharing's Effectiveness (GAO/RCED-93-6) (Dec. 7, 1992) (full-text).

Overview Edit

Pursuant to a legislative requirement, the GAO reviewed the effectiveness of royalty-sharing programs established under the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986, focusing on: (1) federal scientists' interest in reporting inventions before and after the Act's passage; and (2) the extent to which agencies' program implementation supports royalty-sharing incentives.

The GAO found that: (1) royalty-sharing programs at federal laboratories had little impact on scientists' interest in patenting inventions; (2) 14 of 21 agencies showed no improvement in the rate of patenting after the Act's passage; (3) the small licensing rate increase provided no incentive to scientists to patent inventions; (4) most inventors received an average of $1,000 in shared royalties; (5) many scientists preferred peer recognition to monetary rewards; and (6) many scientists chose federal employment because it offered more freedom, creativity, and longer time frames for research than private-sector employment.

GAO also found that: (1) agencies typically used formulas that gave inventors a small percentage of royalties; (2) many scientists did not know of the royalty-sharing programs, and believed that conflict-of-interest policies would hamper collaboration with industry; (3) many agencies did not capitalize on their inventors' successes to publicize their royalty-sharing programs; (4) agencies did not have adequate systems to ensure that inventors timely received royalty payments; (5) some agencies used the laboratory-share of royalties to pay administrative costs, rather than enhance laboratory research or personnel development; and (6) patenting delayed publication of research results, which was important to scientists' professional recognition.

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki