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Statement of Policy on the Management of Internet Names and Addresses

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Citation Edit

NTIA, Statement of Policy on the Management of Internet Names and Addresses (the "White Paper") (June 5, 1998) (full-text).

Overview Edit

The White Paper confirmed the call contained in the "Green Paper" (A Proposal to Improve the Technical Management of Internet Names and Addresses) for the creation of a new, private, not-for-profit corporation responsible for coordinating specific DNS functions for the benefit of the Internet as a whole. It noted:

The U.S. Government is committed to a transition that will allow the private sector to take leadership for DNS management. Most commenters shared this goal. While international organizations may provide specific expertise or act as advisors to the new corporation, the U.S. continues to believe, as do most commenters, that neither national governments acting as sovereigns nor intergovernmental organizations acting as representatives of governments should participate in management of Internet name and addresses. Of course, national governments now have, and will continue to have, authority to manage or establish policy for their own ccTLDs.

Intellectual property rights Edit

Concerning intellectual property, the White Paper stated:

The U.S. Government will seek international support to call upon the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) to initiate a balanced and transparent process, which includes the participation of trademark holders and members of the Internet community who are not trademark holders, to (1) develop recommendations for a uniform approach to resolving trademark/domain name disputes involving cyberpiracy (as opposed to conflicts between trademark holders with legitimate competing rights), (2) recommend a process for protecting famous trademarks in the generic top level domains, and (3) evaluate the effects, based on studies conducted by independent organizations, such as the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, of adding new gTLDs and related dispute resolution procedures on trademark and intellectual property holders. These findings and recommendations could be submitted to the board of the new corporation for its consideration in conjunction with its development of registry and registrar policy and the creation and introduction of new gTLDs.

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