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Sears, Roebuck v. Merla

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Citation Edit

Sears, Roebuck & Co. v. Merla, 142 N.J. Super. 205, 361 A.2d 68 (1976) (full-text).

Trial Court Proceedings Edit

The plaintiff, in an action for an account due, sought to introduce at trial a printout giving information as to purchases, amounts paid, dates, etc. After transferring this information to the computer, it was the usual policy of plaintiff to destroy the original invoices. The trial judge, expressing a disdain for computer technology,[1] granted defendant's motion to dismiss.

The appellate court reversed, holding that "as long as proper foundation is laid, a computer printout is admissible on the same basis as any other business record.”[2] The court conclude that, "because the business records exception is intended to bring the realities of the business world into the courtroom, a record kept on computer in the ordinary course of business qualifies as competent evidence.”[3]


  1. 142 N.J. Super. at 207, 361 A.2d as 68.
  2. Id. at 207, 361 A.2d at 69.
  3. Id.

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