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New and Emerging Technologies 911 Improvement Act of 2008

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Citation Edit

New and Emerging Technologies 911 Improvement Act of 2008 (NET 911 Act), Pub. L. No. 110-283, 122 Stat. 2620 (2008).

Overview Edit

The Act became law on July 23, 2008, requiring Internet Protocol-enabled voice service providers (VoIP) to provide 911 and enhanced 911 (E911) services, and requiring various regulatory undertakings by the Federal Communications Commission.

The Act tasked the National E9-1-1 Implementation Coordination Office to develop

a national plan for migrating to a national [Internet Protocol] IP-enabled emergency network capable of receiving and responding to all citizen-activated emergency communications and improving information sharing among all emergency response entities.

The result was the A National Plan for Migrating to IP-Enabled 9-1-1 Systems.

FCC obligations Edit

Pursuant to Section 101 of the NET 911 Act, the FCC must collect information regarding any fees collected by the states or other jurisdictions in connection with 911/E911 services, specifically, information “detailing the status in each State of the collection and distribution of such fees or charges, and including findings on the amount of revenues obligated or expended by each State or political subdivision thereof for any purpose other than the purpose for which any such fees or charges are specified.”[1]

Section 101 of the NET 911 Act further requires the FCC to file "within 1 year after the date of enactment of the [NET 911 Act], and annually thereafter" a report with the Congress “detailing the status in each State of the collection and distribution of such fees or charges, and including findings on the amount of revenues obligated or expended by each State or political subdivision thereof for any purpose other than the purpose for which any such fees or charges are specified.”[2]

On July 22, 2009, the FCC submitted to Congress its first annual “Report to Congress on State Collection and Distribution of 911 and Enhanced 911 Fees and Charges.”[3] On August 10, 2010, the FCC submitted to Congress its second annual "Report to Congress on State Collection and Distribution of 911 and Enhanced 911 Fees and Charges.”[4]

References Edit

  1. Id. at §101. Section 101(1) of the NET 911 Act affirms the ability of “[a] State, political subdivision thereof, Indian tribe, or village or regional corporation serving a region established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended . . .” to collect fees or charges “[applicable] to commercial mobile services or IP-enabled voice services . . . for the support or implementation of 9-1-1 or enhanced 9-1-1 services, provided that the fee or charge is obligated or expended only in support of 9-1-1 and enhanced 9-1-1 services, or enhancements of such services, as specified in the provision of State or local law adopting the fee or charge. For each class of subscribers to IP-enabled voice services, the fee or charge may not exceed the amount of any such fee or charge applicable to the same class of subscribers to telecommunications services.” Id. §101(2).
  2. Id. §6(f)(2) specifically directs the Commission to file its reports with the Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives.
  3. Federal Communications Commission, Export to Congress on State Collection and Distribution of 911 and Enhanced 911 Fees and Charges (July 22, 2009) (full-text).
  4. Federal Communications Commission, Second Annual Report to Congress on State Collection and Distribution of 911 and Enhanced 911 Fees and Charges (Aug. 10, 2010) (full-text).

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