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National Geospatial Advisory Committee

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Overview Edit

The National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) is a Federal Advisory Committee sponsored by the Department of the Interior under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. It was formed in early 2008 to provide advice and recommendations to the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) on management of federal geospatial programs, development of the NSDI, and implementation of the OMB Circular No. A-16. The NGAC reports to the Chair of the Federal Geographic Data Committee (Secretary of the Interior or designee). As part of its charter, NGAC provides a forum to convey views representative of non-federal stakeholders in the geospatial community.

In its January 2009 report, The Changing Geospatial Landscape, NGAC noted that as geospatial data production has shifted from the federal government to the private sector and state and local governments, new partnerships for data sharing and coordination are needed. Specifically:

the hodgepodge of existing data sharing agreements are stifling productivity and are a serious impediment to use even in times of emergency. . . . When the federal government was the primary data provider, regulations required data to be placed in the public domain. This policy jump-started a new marketplace and led to the adoptions of GIS capabilities across public and commercial sectors. However, these arrangements are very different when data assets are controlled by private companies or local governments.[1]

NGAC observed further that the federal government's need for land parcel (cadastral data) data, which is also emphasized by the [National Research Council]], is missing an arrangement for acquiring the detailed property-related data necessary to make decisions during times of emergency. The report suggests that detailed land parcel data — its use, value, and ownership — is needed by FEMA, the USFS, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for emergency preparedness, response to hurricanes and wildfires, or to monitor foreclosure problems.[2]

References Edit

  1. NGAC, The Changing Geospatial Landscape 12 (Jan. 2009).
  2. Id.

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