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National Defense: Evaluation of Defense Attempts To Manage Battlefield Intelligence Data

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Citation Edit

General Accounting Office, National Defense: Evaluation of Defense Attempts To Manage Battlefield Intelligence Data (LCD-81-23) (Feb. 24, 1981) (full-text).

Overview Edit

The Battlefield Exploitation and Target Acquisition (BETA) project was initiated as a joint service experiment to develop a test bed for automated collection, analysis, correlation, and dissemination of tactical intelligence data. The experiment was estimated to cost $98 million through completion in fiscal year 1984. However, in June 1980 congressional committees redirected the project after learning of the BETA development schedule slippage, inordinate cost increases, reduced capabilities, and poor performance during testing. The GAO reviewed the present status of the BETA project.

The GAO concluded that: (1) the BETA project capabilities were not sufficiently developed and tested to provide a baseline for early fielding of an operational system and considerable corrective action is needed to achieve this goal; (2) the data are not processed within required response times to provide sufficient technical information for the engineering development effort; (3) pressure from the Department of Defense management to test BETA in a European demonstration contributed significantly to project development problems such as cost growth and reduced performance requirements; (4) prior to congressional direction to form a joint service project, the U.S. Air Force was the only service committed to using the BETA design and software to facilitate the early fielding of an operational correlation system; and (5) the U.S. Army, which requires functions in addition to those provided by BETA, planned further test bed experiments while it continued analyzing its correlation system requirements. The U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps foresee very limited application of present BETA technology to their projects.

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