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Definitions Edit

A mobile device

[is] a transmitting device designed to be used in other than fixed locations and to generally be used in such a way that a separation distance of at least 20 centimeters is normally maintained between the transmitter's radiating structure(s) and the body of the user or nearby persons.[1]
include[s] smartphones and tablet computers that support multiple wireless network connectivity options (primarily cellular and Wi-Fi), and host voice and data applications. The devices run mobile operating systems which are used to access mobile sensors, data and voice services.[2]
[is a] portable cartridge/disk-based, removable storage media (e.g., floppy disks, compact disks, USB flash drives, external hard drives, and other flash memory cards/drives that contain nonvolatile memory).[3]
[is a] [p]ortable computing and communications device with information storage capability (e.g., notebook/laptop computers, personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, digital cameras, and audio recording devices).[4]
[is a] portable computing device that: (i) has a small form factor such that it can easily be carried by a single individual; (ii) is designed to operate without a physical connection (e.g., wirelessly transmit or receive information); (iii) possesses local, non-removable or removable data storage; and (iv) includes a self-contained power source. Mobile devices may also include voice communication capabilities, on-board sensors that allow the devices to capture information, and/or built-in features for synchronizing local data with remote locations. Examples include smart phones, tablets, and E-readers.[5]

Overview Edit

Once associated only with voice telephone service, mobile devices have become the launching pads for new data-driven technologies and services. Today, mobile devices include portable cartridge/disk-based, removable storage media (e.g., floppy disks, compact disks, USB flash drives, external hard drives, and other flash memory cards/drives that contain non-volatile memory) or portable computing and communications device with information storage capability (e.g., notebook/laptop computers, personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, digital cameras, and audio recording devices).

Mobile devices are rapidly incorporating technology such as Global Positioning System, accelerometers, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, enhanced graphics and multi-touch screens.

Today, consumers use mobile devices for myriad purposes, including "chatting" through text messaging, taking photographs, browsing the Web, making purchases, listening to music, viewing videos, playing videogames across cyberspace, and keeping track of friends and relatives. "[T]he use of mobile devices has grown so rapidly that mobile devices now outnumber people in the United States, and nearly as many people have a mobile phone as have a bank account."[6]

U.S. consumers who use their wireless device to access the Internet are particularly interested in obtaining information about traffic, restaurants, movies, stock quotes, maps, sports, and weather.

"Mobile devices that access Government resources or process Government data are subject to Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS), specifically FIPS 140-2, FIPS 199, FIPS 200, and FIPS 201."[7]

Features Edit

The following hardware and software characteristics collectively define the baseline characteristics of a mobile device:

The following list identifies other common, but optional, characteristics of mobile devices. These features do not define the scope of devices included, but rather indicate features that are particularly important in terms of security risk. This list is not intended to be exhaustive, and is merely illustrative of common features of interest as of this writing.

"Different mobile devices have different technical and physical characteristics (e.g., size, weight, processor speed, memory capacity). Mobile devices may also use different types of expansion capabilities to provide additional functionality. Furthermore, mobile device capabilities sometimes include those of other devices such as handheld Global Positioning Systems (GPS), cameras (still and video) or personal computers. Overall, mobile devices can be classified as feature phones that are primarily simple voice and messaging communication devices or smartphones that offer more advanced capabilities and services for multimedia, similar to those of a personal computer."[8]

References Edit

  1. 47 C.F.R. §2.1091(b).
  2. Government Mobile and Wireless Security Baseline, at 2.
  3. NIST Special Publication 800-53.
  4. Id.
  5. NIST Special Publication SP 800-171, App. B.
  6. See Cecilia Kang, "A Nation Outnumbered By Gadgets," Wash. Post (Oct. 12, 2011) (full-text); Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Consumer and Mobile Financial Services 2014, at 4-5 (2014) (full-text).
  7. Mobile Security Reference Architecture, at 3.
  8. NIST Special Publication 800-101, Rev. 1, at 4.

Source Edit

See also Edit

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