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Globalization Task Force

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Overview Edit

In October 1998, the NSTAC's Globalization Task Force (GTF) (previously the Information Infrastructure Group) (IIG) was tasked to postulate on the nature of the Global Information Infrastructure (GII) in 2010 and to assess the implications for NS/EP communications. The GTF conducted research and received briefings from industry and Government experts on the emerging wireline, wireless, and satellite-based technologies expected to compose the GII in 2010.

The GTF concluded that in 2010, NS/EP communications would be facilitated by a GII featuring new technologies and improved network features. The GII in 2010 would also provide increased global availability of broadband communications, with satellite communications and wireless technologies bringing the GII and NS/EP communications to less accessible geographic regions. However, despite the plethora of technological capabilities forecasted for 2010, there is no guarantee that all essential communications capabilities will be ubiquitously available. Given the global reach and communications needs of some U.S. NS/EP missions, prudent NS/EP communications contingency planning should consider end-to-end systems using a broad range of wireless, satellite, and terrestrial capabilities.

In addition to planning for the global availability of the GII in 2010, the Government must also consider the richness of service envisioned in the future network architecture and decide whether NS/EP communications will require quality of service (QoS) features beyond commercially available capabilities. Any, and perhaps all, the potential protocols of 2010 could be considered candidates for hosting NS/EP requirements, thus the Government must continue being proactive in its attempts to cooperate in the development of industry standards and technical specifications for next-generation and Internet Protocol (IP)-based networks.

The GTF also examined the implications of foreign ownership of critical U.S. telecommunications facilities on NS/EP services.

The findings of the GTF were published in its NSTAC Globalization Task Force Report.

Source Edit

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