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Enterprise architecture

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Definitions Edit

E-Government Act of 2002 Edit

Enterprise architecture:

(A) means — (I) a strategic information asset base, which defines the mission; (ii) the information necessary to perform the mission; (iii) the technologies necessary to perform the mission; and (iv) the transitional processes for implementing new technologies in response to changing mission needs; and (B) includes — (I) a baseline architecture; (ii) a target architecture; and (iii) a sequencing plan.[1]

General Edit

Enterprise architecture (EA) is

[t]he description of an enterprise's entire set of information systems: how they are configured, how they are integrated, how they interface to the external environment at the enterprise’s boundary, how they are operated to support the enterprise mission, and how they contribute to the enterprise's overall security posture.[2]
[a] strategic information asset base, which defines the mission; the information necessary to perform the mission; the technologies necessary to perform the mission; and the transitional processes for implementing new technologies in response to changing mission needs; and includes a baseline architecture; a target architecture; and a sequencing plan.[3]

U.S. government Edit

An enterprise architecture

[is] a blueprint, or road map, of an agency's current and planned operating and systems environment, as well as an IT investment plan for transitioning between the two.[4]
is a blueprint for organizational change defined in models that describe (in both business and technology terms) how the entity operates today and how it intends to operate in the future; it also includes a plan for transitioning to this future state. Agency enterprise architectures are organized based on functional groupings referred to as segments — core mission areas (e.g., homeland security, health), and business service (e.g., financial management, human capital). IT human capital planning determines the agency's IT skill needs, analyzes gaps between skills on hand and future needs, and develops a plan to address the needs.[5]
provides a clear and comprehensive picture of an entity, whether it is an organization (e.g., federal department or agency) or a functional or mission area that cuts across more than one organization (e.g., financial management). This picture consists of snapshots of the enterprise's current and target operational and technological environments and contains a road map for transitioning from the current to the target environment. An enterprise architecture program management plan would, among other things, (1) reflect Environment enterprise architecture program work activities, events, and time frames for improving Environment enterprise architecture management practices and addressing needed architecture content and (2) define accountability mechanisms to help ensure that the plan is implemented.[6]

Overview Edit

Agency enterprise architectures typically contain three components: (1) baseline, or "as-is" architecture, (2) future, or "to-be" architecture and (3) transition plan, or modernization blueprint. The component of the enterprise architecture which presents the existing enterprise strategy, the current business practices and the associated technical infrastructure is defined as a "baseline" or "as-is" architecture. The "as-is" architecture can be used to reduce costs and increase interoperability.

The second component of the enterprise architecture, the "target" or "to-be" architecture, describes the desired, future state for an organization. Like the "as-is" architecture, the "to-be" architecture defines the enterprise in terms of its strategy, business, and technical dimensions.

The third component of an enterprise architecture, the "transition plan" or "modernization blueprint" presents the plan for how an agency will transform from its baseline or "as-is" state to its target or "to-be" state. The transition plan speaks to the lifecycle of the security and privacy controls at each level of the enterprise architecture.

A well-defined EA provides a clear and comprehensive picture of an entity, whether it is an organization (e.g., federal department or agency) or a functional or mission area that cuts across more than one organization (e.g., homeland security) by documenting the entity's current operational and technological environment and its target environment, as well as a plan for transitioning from the current to the target environment.[7]

References Edit

  1. E-Government Act of 2002.
  2. NIST Special Publication 800-39, at B-4.
  3. NIST Special Publication 800-53, App. B, Glossary; 44 U.S.C. §3601.]
  4. Social Security Administration: Improved Planning and Performance Measures Are Needed to Help Ensure Successful Technology Modernization, at 17 n.21.
  5. Information Technology: FDA Has Taken Steps to Address Challenges but Needs a Comprehensive Strategic Plan, at 8 n.12.
  6. GAO, High-Risk Series: Update 178 n.9 (GAO-13-283) (Feb. 2013).
  7. Information Sharing: Progress Made and Challenges Remaining in Sharing Terrorism-Related Information, at 9 n.15.

Source Edit

See also Edit

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