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End User License Agreement

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Definition Edit

An End User License Agreement (EULA) is a printed or online agreement that sets forth the terms under which a user can utilized a website, software program or online service.

Categories of EULAs Edit

There are three general categories of EULAs:

Importance of EULAs Edit

EULAs can include a number of items you should seriously consider before installing the software. In general, you should note the following facts about EULAs:
  • EULAs are legally binding. Some consumer advocates have challenged the legality of EULAs, especially long agreements clouded in complicated “legalese.” The advocates argue these EULAs are a strategy for discouraging careful review and hiding controversial terms and conditions. However, a number of influential court decisions have upheld the legality of EULAs, so you need to assume you’re entering into legal agreements when you accept their terms.
  • EULAs restrict how you can use the software. EULAs often include clauses that limit the number of computers you can load the software on. They sometimes also prohibit [[[reverse engineering]] for the purpose of creating compatible software. In some cases they prohibit software testing and even publishing the results of this testing.
  • EULAs may force you to agree to certain conditions when using the software. Many software bundles force you to use all bundled components, including software produced by third-party publishers. They may also require you to agree to monitoring of your internet activity and/or sharing your computer’s resources.
  • EULAs can limit your ability to sue for damages. Most EULAs include a clause that says you cannot sue the publisher for any damages caused by using the software.[1]

References Edit

  1. Software License Agreements: Ignore at Your Own Risk, at 2.

External links Edit

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