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Digitized signature

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Definition Edit

A digitized signature is

[a] written signature that has been read by a computer scanner and converted into digital data.[1]

Overview Edit

Some applications require an individual to create his or her handwritten signature using a special computer input device, such as a digital pen and pad. The digitized representation of the entered signature may then be compared to a previously-stored copy of a digitized image of the handwritten signature. When someone wishes to sign an electronic document, they simply insert the image of their signature where appropriate. When the receiver views an electronic document or message, they immediately recognize the meaning of the digitized signature.

Security Edit

This application of technology shares the same security issues as those using the PIN or password approach, because the digitized signature is another form of shared secret known both to the user and to the system. The digitized signature can be more reliable for authentication than a password or PIN because there is a biometric component to the creation of the image of the handwritten signature.

Forging a digitized signature can be more difficult than forging a paper signature since the technology digitally compares the submitted signature image with the known signature image, and is better than the human eye at making such comparisons. The biometric elements of a digitized signature, which help make it unique, are in measuring how each stroke is made — duration, pen pressure, etc. As with all shared secret techniques, compromise of a digitized signature image or characteristics file could pose a security (impersonation) risk to users.

References Edit

  1. Government Smart Card Handbook, App. A, at A-3.

Source Edit

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