The IT Law Wiki

Copyright Alert System

32,062pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Add New Page Talk0

Overview Edit

The Copyright Alert System (CAS) is a private system for alerting and punishing internet subscribing customers of AT&T, Cablevision, Time Warner, Verizon and Comcast in regards to accusations of bit torrent use via their home networks to access alleged copyrighted material from a list of specific entertainment corporations and their CAS registered content. It is limited to customers of those internet vendors in the United States. The consortium that manages the program has branded it as the "six strikes program."

It is intended to be a graduated response system wherein participating ISPs send up to six electronic warnings notifying subscribers of alleged copyright infringement, as reported by a monitoring service working on behalf of participating copyright owners. The first two notices are "educational" notices, which inform subscribers of the alleged infringement, remind them of copyright rules and encourage them to seek content through legitimate sources. The third and fourth notices are "acknowledgment" notices which, in addition to the education notice, require acknowledgment from the subscriber, for example, by clicking on a pop-up notice. The final two notices advise that a "mitigation measure" will be applied.

If copyright infringement is reported after a final warning, the ISPs have agreed to implement "mitigation measures," which may include, for example, bandwidth throttling, or redirection to a landing page until the subscriber contacts the ISP.

The costs of the Copyright Alert System are divided equally between rights holders and ISPxs.

The CAS framework was established on July 7, 2011 by the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), after 3 years in the making. After multiple delays, ISPs began implementing it in February 2013.

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors). Smallwikipedialogo.png

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki